Amelia Earhart: What The General Public Never Knew

Home Page: Amelia Earhart
About Tod Swindell
Drumming Out False Earhart History
The Curious Mrs. Irene O'Crowley Craigmile-Bolam
Past Significant Amelia Earhart Disappearance Investigations
About 'Operation Earhart' (1960-1970)
The 1980s and 1990s Words Of Monsignor James Francis Kelley On Amelia Earhart
Comparing Amelia Earhart To Irene O'Crowley Craigmile (Surname 'Bolam' added in 1958)
Wikipedia Deceitfully Misleads the Public About Amelia and Irene
Newspaper Fraud Tried To Hide The Truth In 1982

 

The Year Is 2021, And The Truth Pertaining To

What Became Of Amelia Earhart Is Now Plain To See

 

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Irene O'Crowley Craigmile was a real Twentieth Century person.
The individual displayed above was identified that way from the
1940s on, but she was not the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile.
A recent study revealed she did not appear as "Irene" prior to the 1940s.
 
In 1965, it was first suspected that the distinguished looking person above, who was known as Irene, had previously gone by the name of Amelia Earhart. In 1970, she publicly denied she was Amelia Earhart, although it was never outright proved if she was or wasn't the once world famous pilot living with a different name.
 
Now, the results of a privately conducted study have made the truth plain to see.

 
Below are sample elements from the 'digital comparison' section of a forensic research analysis that deeply examined the life stories of two 1930s' flying pals, Amelia Earhart and Irene O'Crowley Craigmile

  

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Amelia Earhart

 
 

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Digital Composite

 
 
 
 
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The post-1940 only Irene.
[The analysis learned that there
was more than one, Irene
O'Crowley Craigmile.]

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Amelia Earhart in 1937...

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begins to...
 

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digitally transition into...
 

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...the post-1940 Irene in 1965
 

The comprehensive Amelia Earhart and Irene O'Crowley Craigmile forensic research study and comparison analysis not only surfaced the reality of more than one Twentieth Century person having been attributed to the same, Irene O'Crowley Craigmile identity; it also left no doubt that the post-1940 only Irene O'Crowley Craigmile was previously known as, Amelia Earhart. Keep going to learn more about this recently learned, and now wholesomely presented finality. 
 

 

About The Original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile

The original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, who Amelia Earhart knew and had flown with in the early 1930s, looked nothing like Amelia:

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This 1930 dated newspaper photo features the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, shown
between her husband, Charles James Craigmile (left) and her father, Richard Joseph O'Crowley.

Tragedy struck the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile's life in 1931, when her husband of three years, Charles James Craigmile, suddenly died:

1931

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After her husband died, the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile decided to become a pilot. With Amelia's encouragement, she purchased a plane in 1932, and she earned her wings in 1933. In fact, she was a pretty good at it for awhile, and became part of an elite group of fliers that based at Long Island, New York's Roosevelt and Floyd Bennett Airfields. 
 

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An old newspaper photo of the
original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile,
shown next to her plane in 1933.
 

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MAY 1933

It was no small feat for any pilot in 1933,
to fly a single engine, two-seater plane to
Chicago from Long Island, New York.

 

In 1967, an elderly, retired pilot by the name of Elmo Pickerill, recalled the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile from the early 1930s, in the following manner:

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Strangely, approximate to when Amelia Earhart went 'missing' in the late 1930s, the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile as well, was no longer evident. In time, clear photo evidence of the original Irene had also been removed from circulation.
 
Whatever became of the original Irene is not publicly known, but it is certain anymore that Amelia Earhart continued to live-on after she was declared missing during the pre-dawn era of World War Two, and in due-time she was able to assume the original Irene's leftover identity for herself to use... for the remainder of her days.
 
Any further, this reality of what became of Amelia Earhart after she went missing in 1937, exists as an obvious truth to behold. 
 

[See more digital comparisons further down.]
 

 
"The forensic studies are very convincing. She was not an ordinary housewife as she claimed. She was influential, knew many well placed people and was well traveled." From an Associated Press article by Ron Staton, John Bolam refers to early results from the 21st Century Amelia-to-Irene forensic comparison analysis orchestrated by Tod Swindell. John Bolam was the generation younger brother of the post-1940 only Irene's British husband, Guy BolamHe died in 2008, not long after making the above statement. 
 

"All one has to do is realize that the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile was a real person who knew Amelia Earhart in the 1930s -- but that she did not look like Amelia -- while understanding at the same time how the post-1940 only Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, proved to be congruent to Amelia Earhart in a head-to-toe manner, and the truth suddenly reveals itself." Tod Swindell 

 
How The 'Irene' Controversy Originally Surfaced:-

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The 1970 book, Amelia Earhart Lives, by Joe Klaas, focused on the results of 'Operation Earhart', a ten-year investigation that concluded by boldly asserting the post-1940 Mrs. Irene O'Crowley Craigmile (later, 'Bolam'), shown next to the book, had previously been known as, Amelia Earhart.

The post-1940 only Irene was blindsided and she denounced the contents of Amelia Earhart Lives, and people ended up making fun of Operation Earhart's assertion about her, after she deliberately convinced the curious that it was outlandish to even suggest that her long ago friend, Amelia Earhart, somehow survived her 1937 disappearance and went on to be known by another name.
 
I have studied this issue for a long time and I'm here to inform all that anymore, mocking the simple notion of Amelia Earhart continuing to live-on after she was declared 'missing', and then changing her name, is no longer judicious. To be sure, it never was judicious. As well, the idea of Amelia Earhart opting to change her name, especially after whatever it was she endured during her period of absence, was never as far-fetched as some individuals made it out to be, nor was it ever an outlandish suggestion. For hindsight now shows that Amelia's survival and name change was not only true, but it was the result of a well thought out and well orchestrated endeavor, the end result of which, that of Amelia Earhart veritably replacing the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, was a reality that was never supposed to be known by the general public.
 
The book Amelia Earhart Lives did catch the living, former Amelia Earhart off guard in 1970, and to her, she recognized no other choice but to deny her true past in order to preserve her privacy, and no doubt as well, to avoid confusion and conflict. Anymore it is completely evident, though, that beyond several off-target assumptions the book presented, it indeed was correct where it asserted that Amelia Earhart survived her disappearance -- and she lived to become known as, 'Irene.' Tod Swindell
 

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Above: The former Amelia Earhart faces the press in 1970. She denounced the contents of the book, Amelia Earhart Lives, denied her true past, and people believed her. Amazingly, however, no one back then thought to compare her to Amelia. Decades later, researcher Tod Swindell's study of Amelia's life story became the first such effort to include an Amelia to Irene, forensic comparison analysis.

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Amelia Earhart
 
 

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Digital Composite
 
 

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The former Amelia as 'Irene' 

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Again, the post-1940 only Irene O'Crowley
Craigmile looked nothing like the original Irene
O'Crowley Craigmile, because she used
to be known as, Amelia Earhart.

 

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Above is another digital composite of Amelia Earhart and
the post-1940 only Irene O'Crowley Craigmile (Bolam),
from the first-ever 'Amelia versus Irene' comparison
analysis. [The study issued many comparisons.]
 

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Above, the cover of Shirley Dobson Gilroy's classic 1985,
"artistic tribute to Amelia Earhart" book, Amelia / Pilot In Pearls
 

 

It's Over...-

 

The results of a long-term, comprehensive forensic research analysis that studied Amelia Earhart's life story and her 1937 disappearance and missing person case in a revolutionary kind of way are presented here, and they display the veritable truth pertaining to what became of Amelia after she went missing.

Amelia Earhart aficionados were already familiar with the unresolved, Amelia/Irene controversy from the 1970s. The analysis results confirmed that the top photo portrait shows the former Amelia Earhart in 1977, who lived the remainder of her days after the 1930s, with the identity of Irene O'Crowley Craigmile applied to her person. It is now a reality to behold, that from the 1940s on, the former Amelia Earhart was known as, Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, until 1958, when she married Guy Bolam, of England, that updated her name to, Irene O'Crowley Craigmile Bolam. [From 1958 on she was more commonly known as, "Mrs. Irene Bolam" or "Mrs. Guy Bolam".]

Amelia Earhart knew and had flown with the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile in the early 1930s. After the original Irene endured a tough decade, though, by the late 1930s she no longer appeared. You will find out more about the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile as you continue reviewing the analysis results displayed here. You will also ascertain for yourself how from the 1940s on, even though the person featured in the top portrait photo was legally known as Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, (and later, 'Bolam') she definitely was not the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile. Rather, she was the former Amelia Earhart, according to the forensic research discoveries and comparison results the analysis delivered.

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Amelia Earhart in 1937, right before she
purportedly, disappeared without a trace.
~~~
 

  

If you cannot fathom the truth about what became of Amelia Earhart by way of the analysis results displayed here, it is most likely because your care worn Earhart soul won't permit you to. Your chance to recognize the truth about Amelia, though, is by being considerate to what this in-depth analysis discovered about her, as opposed to dismissing it all out of hand. The people who have been Earhart educated in misleading directions will likely influence you in a 'don't believe what you see here' way, as will stodgy historians that will tell you to disregard the now plain to observe reality that shows what became of Amelia Earhart after she went missing. Notwithstanding their opinions and other false platitudes--that conflicts a person's ability to maintain a sense of proportion about Amelia--it is your right, if you wish to observe and know the truth, to keep going here. Tod Swindell, 2021

  

 
A Note About A Person's Looks
 
Throughout her famous career, Amelia Earhart demonstrated a variety of looks. Below left is the same photo of her taken during her 1937 world flight, just before she went missing. When compared to the 1932 photograph in the center and the 1928 far right photos, it's hard to recognize they all display the same person. [Food for thought when comparing individuals and their different looks.]
 

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Below, all Amelia...

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~~~
The Origin Of The Now Recognizable
Truth About Amelia Earhart
 
Few recall the contentious, never resolved story from 1970, about an assertion that stated Amelia Earhart continued to survive after she was declared missing in 1937and how she was later discovered in the U.S. living under an assumed identity:
 

November of 1970 Headlines:

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The University of Texas at Dallas, that houses a special collection of U.S. aviation historical research, recently cited that Amelia's survival in the described manner above was plausible given the amount of credible evidence that supported it. Keep going to find out why, and what more results from the new, comprehensive analysis learned about the shared Twentieth Century identity of, Irene O'Crowley Craigmile (Bolam).
 
Note: Wikipedia's "Irene Craigmile Bolam" page presents a falsified brief about the never resolved 'Amelia became Irene' assertion, where it suggests the Irene identity controversy was settled using known facts about her life, and by way of a forensic detective hired by the National Geographic Society in 2006. The study learned that the National Geographic Society never hired a forensic detective that delivered a final conclusion about Irene's life-long identity, and facts about the original Irene, who had known Amelia in the 1930s, are easy for anyone to trace.
 
It is important to point out that there is no record of any forensically drawn conclusion that stated Amelia Earhart did not live to become known as, 'Irene O'Crowley Craigmile (Bolam)' in her later life years. So wikipedia's page is misleading where it implies such a thing.
 
In the meantime, an overwhelming preponderance of both forensic and circumstantial evidence accumulated in decades gone by indicates that Amelia did live on after she went missing, and at some point, for reasons only she and very few others understood, she assumed the leftover identity of a person she used to know, whose name was Irene O'Crowley Craigmile
  
~~~

   


Below again, the original Irene

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The old 1930 newspaper photo above, features the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, shown
between her husband, Charles J. Craigmile (left) and her father, Richard Joseph O'Crowley.
According to the forensic analysis results, at some point the post-1940 only Irene assumed the
original Irene's leftover identity. As well, also according to the analysis results, there were a
total of three different women attributed to the same "Irene O'Crowley Craigmile" identity.
Note: Clear photo records of the original Irene were removed from circulation long ago.

1

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1918

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1930

2

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1945

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1980

3

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1946

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1965

 
Thanks to the analysis results, it is now fairly easy for one to recognize with a naked eye, that the above younger to older images are those of the three different people who were attributed to the same Twentieth Century identity of Irene O'Crowley Craigmile. Individually they were: 1.) The original Irene. 2.) The surrogate mother Irene, and 3.) The post-1940 only Irene. 
 

 
There are people, of course, including the survived families of both Amelia and Irene, who never wanted the long existing, 'Amelia versus Irene' controversy to be seriously addressed, let alone have the truth of Amelia's post disappearance existence in such a well hidden manner be known by the general public. But now it is known, and it needs to be reckoned with. As mentioned, the Twenty First Century study that delivered the Earhart truth was only recently finalized, so its findings have yet to be formally accepted, but it is certain they will be. It came down to simple true or false reality checks, and hands down the truth of Amelia's post-disappearance life as Irene easily prevailed when all was said and done.
 


 
More About The Original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile:

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1931

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Note: After Charles James Craigmile died of a sudden illness in 1931, his widow, the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, who had met Amelia Earhart before, turned to Amelia and Amelia's well-known pilot friend, Viola Gentry, to pursue her new dream of learning to fly: 

 

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Amelia Earhart in 1921. In 1928, when she was thirty years old
she suddenly became famous. Soon after that she met the original
 Irene O'Crowley Craigmile through Irene's aunt, a noted attorney
by the name of Irene Rutherford O'Crowley. In 1929, Amelia
 Earhart and Viola Gentry became charter members of the 99s'. 

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Above, Viola Gentry in 1927.
She came to know the original
Irene through Amelia Earhart.
Viola Gentry was famous for her
endurance flying and stunt flying. 

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The original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile,
shown next to her plane in 1933, the year
she earned her pilot's license. Her future
as a pilot would be interrupted not 
long after this picture was taken.
 

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As fate had it, just after the original Irene earned her pilot's license in mid-1933, she became pregnant out of wedlock, that naturally interrupted her new life as a pilot. She went on to deliver a baby boy in early 1934, yet by the late 1930s, her son, (whose father was estranged) was being raised by a 'nanny' mother figure whom he grew up believing to be his biological mother. The original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile's pilot license was not renewed beyond 1937, and to this day her ultimate fate remains unclear. Her leftover identity, however, helped Amelia to become the non-public person that she had missed being during her fame years.
 
Before Amelia left on her 1937 world flight, she was sure to announce it would be her last flight of any significance, and she turned the attention of news reporters toward her pilot friend, Jackie Cochran, proclaiming that Jackie stood to be America's new female aviation heroine going forward.

Note: For some insight toward the way Amelia regarded the world fame she achieved during her flying career, consider the Doris Rich quote below.
 
"Over the nine years spanning her first and last transoceanic flights, Amelia Earhart became one of the most famous women in the world. The private Amelia disliked that fame intensely." From author-historian, Doris Rich's 1989 biography of Amelia Earhart.
 

Below, again, the 1967 note from one Elmo Pickerill, Secretary of the Early Birds of Aviation of Long Island, New York, ties the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile together with Amelia Earhart and Viola Gentry in the 1930s:

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~~~

Below again is the post-1940 only Irene O'Crowley Craigmile (Bolam) shown facing the press in 1970, to decry the contents of the new McGraw-Hill book, Amelia Earhart Lives.

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Two statements the post-1940 only Irene (Mrs. Bolam) made about herself in 1970:

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[The record showed that the original Irene O'Crowley
married Charles James Craigmile in late 1928.] 
 

 
~~~
 
About The "post 1940 only Irene" Moniker
 
The analysis discovered that the post-1940 only Irene O'Crowley Craigmile (Bolam) was not identifiable anywhere as 'Irene' prior to the 1940s. When combined with its other realizations, hindsight revealed that the post-1940 only Irene's past identity question emerged in 1970 as a valid controversy -- that became obfuscated by endless deliberating -- thus enabling the former Amelia Earhart to continue on living the post-World War Two era 'private life' she'd grown accustomed to, and so obviously preferred not to abandon.

 
Two Friends...

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Above: Eleanor Roosevelt and Amelia Earhart in 1933.
The two became friends after they met. Below is a digital
composite of Amelia's above image and a 1965 taken photo
of the post-1940 only Irene O'Crowley Craigmile (Bolam).

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~~~ 
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"It is nearly impossible even for families to recognize a loved one after thirty years of absence, so greatly has the self altered. And a little reflection upon the changing quality of consciousness is sure to give us some insight into the numberless selves our surface minds and egos have become since first appearing in the world." Philosopher Uell Stanley Andersen (1917-1986)

 
Below, the post-1940 only Irene O'Crowley Craigmile Bolam in 1965.
 her look here may not remind us of her former life, yet there is no
question anymore that she did used to be known as Amelia Earhart.

JOSEPH A. GERVAIS PHOTO
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POST-1940 ONLY IRENE O'CROWLEY CRAIGMILE BOLAM

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Again Amelia...
 

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digitally transition into...
 

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...her future Irene self in 1965
 

~~~ 
An Executive Branch Quandary
Even A War Couldn't End

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President Franklin Delano Roosevelt
 


Below find excerpts from a document generated by the White House nine months after Amelia Earhart was declared a missing person. The full transcript it came from concerned information President Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration withheld that pertained to what actually happened to the famous pilot:

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To this day no explanation has been given to account for the above recorded words, but it is now certain that Amelia Earhart continued to live-on well past July 2, 1937, the date she went missing. Here, one can understand why the secrecy that concerned what really happened to Amelia in July of 1937, and what became of her afterward, managed to remain in tact.

 

Note: The spirit of forensically recognizing and accepting the truth about what became of Amelia Earhart, was not born from an idea suggesting FDR's administration used bad judgment during the pre-dawn era of World War Two, when it optioned not to publicly disclose what it learned about the outcome of Amelia's failed world flight attempt.


~~~
Issued in 1987 by the Republic of the Marshall Islands:
 
Below is a 50th Anniversary commemorative stamp depicting Japan's Imperial
Navy rescuing Earhart and Noonan, and recovering Amelia's plane. This occurred
at the same time the second Sino-Japanese War was commencing, that served as a
precursor to World War Two. Whatever went wrong with the duo's flight plan, it put
the White House in a tough spot since the U.S. was against Japan's invasion of China.
 
The United States general public was conditioned not to recognize the Marshalls' version
of Amelia Earhart's world flight ending from the time it was first evidenced to a variety of
United States soldiers who had been sent to serve in World War Two's Pacific theater.
 

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Below, this Associated Press article lead-in appeared in 2002. Ever since the World War Two era, different, 'Amelia ended up in the Marshalls' accounts akin to this one kept surfacing. Sadly, in the United States, few seem to care much about this reality based version of Amelia Earhart's world flight ending:

 

 

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Especially in recent decades, people have been cajoled (or misled) into looking for Amelia's plane above all else, even though the sad reality is, her plane will never be found by privately organized and funded expeditions.

~~~

"While I do believe that Amelia Earhart ended her world flight quest in the lower Marshall Islands, I do not believe that she was a spy when she was 'picked up' there by Japan, the Marshall's governing authority when her world flight took place. I do consider, though, where James Donahue's British Connection research from the 1980s comes into play, and statements made by Lockheed employees that referenced how an additional plane similar to Amelia's had been readied to also participate in her world flight plan, that there possibly was a British supplied man and woman flight team in some other plane, that while doing reconnaissance over the Marshalls adjacent to Amelia's "civilian" flight plan, had encountered trouble and went down there. Where the White House transcript cited that Amelia disregarded all orders, this may have been relative to Amelia unexpectedly rerouting her flight and heading to the Marshall's in an effort to help the downed fliers, one of whom may have been the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile. (The original Irene was a competent pilot who had known Amelia, and Amelia was not shy and spoke several languages, including some Japanese.) Unfortunately, the move backfired when Amelia learned the other plane had been shot down and the pilots did not survive, and she also realized she was viewed by Japan's military as a diversion 'accomplice' to the other plane's illicit activities, thus prompting her detainment, and eventually leading to the official silence to always be maintained toward the matter by the governments of the United States and Japan." Tod Swindell
 

"Numerous investigations foundered on official silence in Washington and Tokyo, leaving the true fate of Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan an everlasting mystery." 1982, aviation historians, Marylin Bender and Selig Altschul on the 1937 disappearance and subsequent missing person cases of Amelia Earhart, and her navigator, Fred Noonan, quoted from their book, The Chosen Instrument.
 

 

 

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Above is Amelia Earhart in 1928, the year she instantly became famous. Nine years later, in 1937, she purportedly disappeared without a trace, and according to history she was never seen again.
 
Many documented World War Two 'Pacific Theater' servicemen from the U.S. and Japan, along with South Sea Islands' government officials and residents, disagreed with history there. They commonly stated, based on the eyewitness accounts of people who saw Amelia alive overseas after she was declared missing, and on other corroborating testimonials, that Amelia Earhart lived-on well after the date of her so called, disappearance. 
 
From the 1960s' on, several investigations that were conducted also agreed with this conclusion. Throughout the war years, Amelia's mother, Amy Otis Earhart, also insisted that her daughter was still alive overseas based on information she'd privately been made aware of.
 

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Again, above is Amelia Earhart (left) and Viola Gentry, two
good pilot friends in the 1930s, who both knew and helped
the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile to earn her wings.
By the late 1930s, however, the original Irene was gone, and
to this day it remains unclear what her ultimate fate was.
 Reusing a few photos, the box below has more on this trio:

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The original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile,
again shown next to her plane in 1933.
 She was commonly referred to as,
'Irene Craigmile' as listed below:

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MAY 1933

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Again, Amelia Earhart, before she became famous. Eight
years after she met the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, 
Amelia Earhart was declared a missing person. Then in 1939,
to release her estate to her next of kin, she was legally
declared, 'dead in absentia' after no certain explanation
to account for what became of her could be given.

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Above, Viola Gentry,
"The Flying Cashier."
She and the original
Irene lived in the same
Brooklyn apartment
building for awhile.
Viola often invited
the original Irene to
events she attended,
like this one in 1933:

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Another 1933 press notice telling of Viola Gentry entertaining Lady Drummond
Hay of England, along with the original Irene Craigmile and other pilots.
Note: Pearl Pellaton lived in the same 316 Rutland Rd apartment
building in Brooklyn that the original Irene and Viola did.

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The above 1932 Akron, Ohio newspaper photo featured Amelia Earhart (outlined in white), Viola Gentry (outlined in gray), next to the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, (outlined in black.) Reprinted from today's available newspaper archive, when enlarged, the original Irene's facial image is the only one in the group with no discernible features: 
 

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Viola Gentry, who maintained Amelia was still alive after she went missing in 1937, was among the individuals who continued to know Amelia -- after Amelia assumed the original Irene's leftover identity. The same goes for Amelia's sister, Muriel. However, they never publicly acknowledged who their later-life friend, 'Irene' used to be. Instead, both strongly contested the suggestion whenever they were asked about it.
 

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There may have been more to the McGraw-Hill publishing controversies that took place in 1971, and their relationship to Amelia Earhart's old 'missing person' case than was realized at the time, and once again, where so, Viola Gentry may have figured in.

That one of the most reputable publishing houses in the world would issue consecutive books that dialed in on the life of Howard Hughes, and then quickly withdraw them both, is somewhat odd in itself. The first book was Amelia Earhart Lives, that threaded a theorized level of involvement that Howard Hughes possibly had in covering for Amelia after she went missing. (Read about the 'Irene Bolam versus McGraw-Hill's Amelia Earhart Lives book lawsuit' further down.) Hughes, a great pilot himself, was a known 1930s acquaintance of Amelia's, but he was never consulted by Joe Klaas, the author of Amelia Earhart Lives, and the book was withdrawn by McGraw-Hill in early 1971, shortly after it was published. Next, throughout 1971, Clifford Irving wrote a supposedly authorized by Howard Hughes 'autobiography' that was set to be published by McGraw-Hill at the end of the year. Once again, however, Clifford Irving did not consult with Hughes, and he was charged with perpetrating a hoax after Hughes objected to his book and claimed he'd never met Irving. This led to pressed copies of the book being burned by McGraw-Hill before they made it into circulation, and to some jail time for Irving as well. Interestingly enough, Joe Klaas was never challenged by Howard Hughes at all, nor was he fined or convicted of any crime, and neither was Joseph A. Gervais, whose ten year investigation Amelia Earhart Lives was largely about.

 

  

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Amelia Earhart Medal

 
 

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Presented to Howard Hughes
by Viola Gentry on Amelia's
sixty-sixth birthday, 7/24/1963

The Amelia Earhart medal displayed above, was presented to Howard Hughes by Viola Gentry two years before the former Amelia Earhart was first publicly recognized for who she used to be. Perhaps not so ironically, it was Viola Gentry who introduced the post-1940 only Irene to the gentleman who recognized her as the former Amelia Earhart, (Joseph A. Gervais) the day before this photograph was taken:

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Above is Viola Gentry and Guy Bolam, on August 9, 1965, outside of the Sea Spray Inn of East Hampton, Long Island. The original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile was long gone by then. Viola had known her, just as she knew the new post-1940 only Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, who had married Guy Bolam in 1958, and who had previously been known as her famous flying friend, Amelia Earhart(Above photo taken by the former Amelia Earhart, AKA, Mrs. Guy Bolam.)
 
Below is an excerpt from Jennifer Bean Bower's 2015 biography of Viola Gentry, The Flying Cashier, where a 1941 interview Viola gave to Maybelle Manning was recalled. While reading these words, know that Viola maintained that her missing friend, Amelia, was still alive throughout the war years, yet after the war ended she stopped talking about her:

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Knowing how close Viola Gentry had been to both Amelia Earhart and the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, it is incomprehensible to even entertain the idea that after 1940, Viola's friend, the original Irene, could have suddenly morphed into an older-version, carbon copy twin of Viola's famous friend, Amelia Earhart, who had gone missing years before, never to be seen again. It turned out the original Irene was gone by the end of the 1930s, and basically, Amelia, who had continued to live-on, took her name in the 1940s to further use for herself. 

 
Once Again...

 

 

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1
Above, Amelia Earhart, age 39...  
 
 
 

 

 

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2
...digitally transitions into...  
 

 

 

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...Mrs. Guy Bolam in 1965
 

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Amelia Earhart, age 36...

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 ...digitally transitions into... 

 

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...Mrs. Guy Bolam in 1977
 

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A Quick Review
'The History of the Mystery' 
 
As we enter 2021 after a most trying year, anymore it seems that people are bored with the subject of Amelia Earhart's odd 1937 disappearance. In recent decades, to regenerate public curiosity, a variety of organizations and theorists, (a few shown below; the oldest being TIGHAR and the newest being the 2017 upstart, Chasing Earhart) took to promoting myriad theories to the news media, within their attempts to offer a solution to the 'mystery' cloud that continued to hover over the legendary pilot's fate. Of little surprise, it turned out that none of their varied conclusions were correct.
 
However, another accredited researcher, Tod Swindell, who deftly avoided media adulation, quietly approached Amelia Earhart's disappearance and missing person case forensically. The results of his work are detailed beneath the following once promoted but now discarded theories.
 

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 TIGHAR

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NAUTICOS

 
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 CHASING EARHART

 

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Richard Gillespie of Tighar,
'learned what happened';
said Amelia flew south of the
Equator to a desert island,
died a castaway, and was
eaten by small land crabs.

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Elgen Long, of Nauticos,
said he 'solved the mystery':
Claimed Amelia flew in an
uncertain direction after
missing Howland, and she
went down in the ocean at
unknown coordinates.

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Mike Campbell said he
found, 'the truth at last';
Claimed Amelia died in
captivity within a ruthless
Nippon military culture.

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Richard Martini of
"Earhart's Electra" felt
he, 'knew the answer';
Amelia was executed
on Saipan by a small
Japanese firing squad.
 

 
Below: The New, 'Paradigm Shift' Alternative
 

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After decades of intense study, what does Tod Swindell profess to know about Amelia Earhart's old missing person case -- and a forgotten controversy in relationship to it?
 
A lot. 
 
Enough to where the differing conclusions offered by past Amelia Earhart theorists were deemed anachronistic with one long ago, prematurely dismissed exception.
 
Here's why: 
 
A forensic analysis he orchestrated with human identity experts, proved instrumental in discovering never before known realities about an infamous assertion from the 1970s, that stated Amelia Earhart privately lived on for years under an assumed identity after she was declared "missing" in 1937, and "dead in absentia" in 1939.
 
To begin with, until the analysis took place, it was not known that a formidable woman known as, Mrs. Irene Bolam, who in the 1970s had been called-out as the former Amelia Earhart, had a physicality about her that proved to be congruent to Amelia Earhart's physicality. It wasn't known because Mrs. Bolam was never actually compared to Amelia Earhart before the analysis took place. After the analysis did take place, when the results were combined with the additional corroborating information that had previously surfaced, (such as the accounts given by Monsignor Kelley, previewed directly below) it became forensically clear that Amelia did survive and in time became known as Irene. 
 

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The post-1940 Irene 
(FKA Earhart) dining with
Monsignor Kelley
 

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1978

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"After all she'd been through she didn't want
to be the famous Amelia Earhart anymore."
Monsignor James Francis Kelley, 1987
 

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Monsignor James Francis
Kelley [1902-1996] held
PhD's in philosophy and
psychology. He admitted to
having counseled Amelia in
the 1940s, and helping with
her identity change as well.
 
 

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The post-1940 only Irene, (FKA Earhart) above on the right, did not like it when people candidly took her picture. Her expression here appeared to make that abundantly clear. The dark haired gal with the gray streak in the photo was Gertrude Kelley Hession, Monsignor James Francis Kelley's sister, who was a regular 1970s traveling companion of Irene's after Guy Bolam died. This photo was taken in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, in 1976. (Note the digital composites below.)
 

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Ever evasive to the press,
when asked about the identity
controversy that concerned his
friend, Irene, Monsignor Kelley
was quoted in 1982 in the New 
Jersey Tribune this way:

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Anecdotal information about the post-1940 Irene and her 1970s' friendship with LPGA promoter, Peter Busatti: 

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Above: The post-1940 Irene and Peter Busatti, 1978
 

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Above left is the post-1940 Irene O'Crowley Craigmile; above center is the post-1940 Irene and Amelia digitally combined; above right is a rare profile photo of Amelia Earhart, taken just before she went missing.

"Peter Busatti said he accompanied Mrs. Bolam to the Wings Club in New York City on one occasion. He said a full length portrait of Amelia Earhart hangs in the room dedicated in her honor. ""It was a dead ringer for Irene,"" he said. ""Sometimes I thought she was [the former Amelia] and sometimes I thought she wasn't. Once when I asked her directly she replied, "When I die you'll find out,"" Busatti said. At a Wings Club event in Washington, Busatti mentioned how, ""All the admirals and generals seemed to know her."" Excerpted from a 1982 New Jersey Tribune article. When interviewed, Peter Busatti openly commented about his suspicion that his friend, the post-1940 Irene O'Crowley Craigmile-Bolam, used to be known as Amelia Earhart.

 

Balloon Rides Anyone?

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The above 'hot air balloon' newspaper photo taken in 1979, features Irene O'Crowley Craigmile-Bolam [FKA 'Amelia'] accompanied by famous golfer, Kathy Whitworth. Especially in the 1970s, after taking over to manage her company's accounts, to include for her main client, Radio Luxembourg, the former Amelia Earhart was simply known as 'Irene Bolam' to friends and associates of hers. In the meantime she had also grown to be respected and admired by important people not only in the United States--but internationally as well. Those who were aware of who she used to be, of course, never talked much about her, such as her friend, Senator Barry Goldwater, who in her later life years she shared her ongoing love of photography with. Senator Goldwater himself was a great pilot who distinguished himself that way in World War Two.

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Anymore, reality states that the woman above was not the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile. Rather, she was known as 'Amelia Earhart' for the first half of her life, and then as 'Irene' for the last half of her life. To not recognize this is to not recognize the truth when it comes to what became of Amelia Earhart after she went missing in 1937.

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A Word from the Orchestrator of the Forensic Analysis

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Tod Swindell and 'Gibson' in 2016
 

I am not, nor have I ever claimed to be a certified forensic expert, but to learn and better understand forensic comparison applications, I educated myself by reading about them, meeting and consulting with forensic detectives, with forensic anthropologists, with physicians, with a voice comparison specialist, and with a document examiner. Ultimately, by the time I finished my forensic endeavoring, twenty-years of a learning process had transpired as I applied various comparison techniques to the dated, yet never settled, did Amelia become known as Irene question. 

I began my 'forensic comparison journey' in 1997. I first registered portions of my research at the Writers Guild of America in 1998, then again under the MSS title of Protecting Earhart in 2004, 2008, 2012, & 2016, revising it along the way. I copyrighted my MSS in 2014, and then again in 2017, with the forensic visual elements added to it. I am now in the process of launching a new website platform while producing a trailer for my upcoming documentary, and am preparing my Protecting Earhart MSS for final publication.

Hocus-pocus has never characterized my work, or "hokum", as it was once accused of being by one of Amelia's living relatives. I was never prone to trickery or fraud, or chicanery or frame. I just let the chips fall.

In recent years I have been unfavorably written about in newer Amelia Earhart books. As well, various media outlets, starting with the National Geographic Channel in 2006, took to downplaying my forensic accomplishments. That never bothered me much, really, because it wasn't until 2020, the horrid year of the Covid 19 outbreak, that I finally started to feel I was ready to go public with my epic, Amelia-to-Irene forensic journey... and the full results it achieved. This included its discovery of the unrealized fact that three Twentieth Century women were attributed to the same 'Irene' identity, with the post-1940 only Irene being the one who matched Amelia. I suppose that amid the fog of 2020, I decided it might provide a good, and possibly enlightening public distraction to come forward with this new information.

I attest that my efforts handily display a forensic reality about Amelia Earhart, pertaining to a truth about her that has been ignored ever since it first surfaced five decades ago.

That's right. In 1970, our national news media alerted our country of this very same truth about Amelia's post-loss survival as Irene, only to see it be categorically shouted-down without being disproved. [Note: A self proclaimed Earhart fanatic, Dr. Alex Mandel of Ukraine, outright fabricated in his 2007 posted, "Irene Craigmile Bolam" wikipedia page, where he wrote that the Irene in question's 'life history' was, "thoroughly documented, eliminating any possibility she was Earhart," and that a Nat Geo forensic detective "concluded" that the 'Amelia became known as Irene' postulation was false. Trust knowing, Dr. Mandel marshaled some loose information that he twisted into lies there.] 

If you cannot fathom the truth about what became of Amelia Earhart by way of my work, it is most likely because your tainted over time Earhart soul disallows you to. Your best chance to recognize it, though, is by giving serious consideration to the analysis results displayed here, rather than dismissing them all out of hand, as you will probably be influenced to do by less Earhart-educated individuals, or by people who simply wish to leave this now observable reality alone. It's up to you.

Otherwise, my own reward of truth came by way of the incredible journey I traveled to get to it. 

For what it's worth, I am thankful for choosing the path less chosen when I came to my Amelia Earhart fork in the road, for it did make all the differenceTod Swindell - 2021

 

"The journey is the reward." Tao

 


~~~ 

 
How It Began 
 
On November 11, 1970, news reporters and cameramen crowded into a law office conference room in New York City, to listen to Mrs. Irene O'Crowley Craigmile Bolam respond to a broad-minded implication about her that appeared in a new book about Amelia Earhart. When asked by a reporter if she used to know Amelia Earhart, Mrs. Bolam acknowledged that she was a long ago friend of hers. The title of the book was, Amelia Earhart Lives.
 

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Amazingly, Amelia Earhart Lives focused on a ten-year investigation that ended by boldly suggesting Mrs. Irene Bolam had previously been known as, Amelia Earhart.

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Mrs. Bolam's Press Conference:

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Caught off guard, but wielding a strong and certain voice, Mrs. Bolam stood alone while reading a statement prepared by her attorney. She admonished the assertion that said she was really Amelia Earhart, then held her ground while briefly answering a few questions. She concluded by strongly denouncing the book, Amelia Earhart Lives, and left the room. Except, the story about her true past was far from over.
 

Below, two statements Mrs. Bolam made about herself in 1970:

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[The record showed that the original Irene O'Crowley
married Charles James Craigmile in 1928.] 
 

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Continuing on...
 
It turned out that the fairly enigmatic, Mrs. Irene O'Crowley Craigmile Bolam, was a jet-setting international businesswoman who in 1958, married Guy Bolam of England, the person who originally founded the business she ran.
 
Beyond facing the press to challenge the McGraw-Hill Company, Amelia Earhart Lives author, Joe Klaas, and Joseph A. Gervais, whose ten year investigation had inspired Klaas to write about it, Mrs. Bolam followed-up with a defamation lawsuit against them.  
 

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Below: The indomitable Mrs. Irene Bolam

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Irene
O'Crowley
Craigmile
Bolam 
Versus
McGraw-Hill

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The Irene Bolam versus McGraw-Hill defamation case that lasted from 1971 to 1976, was more complex than people realized. Mrs. Bolam had claimed to be an ordinary New Jersey housewife, although in actuality, she was a world traveler who presided over 'Guy Bolam Associates' that sported major global clients, to include Radio Luxembourg. 

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Although Mrs. Bolam rejected the book's implication about her, the press conference she held and her subsequent lawsuit did not put an end to her 'real identity' controversy. True, in the years that followed, strangely enough even the New York State legal system (see below) was not able to determine if she was or wasn't the former Amelia Earhart. In fact, few people realized that the controversy over Mrs. Irene Bolam's life-long identity never came close to being settled in a forensic kind of way. 
 

 
1974

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1982

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2009 
"Lou Foudray calls the investigative research of Gervais and Swindell, ""Just the tip of the Iceberg."" "All the evidence all put together, I feel like she [Amelia] did survive. I think she survived and came back to the United States, but that she wanted her privacy." Lou Foudray, Amelia Earhart Historian and former proprietor of the Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum in Atchison, Kansas, is quoted from interviews conducted by Lara Moritz of KMBC TV, Kansas City, and by The Topeka Kansas Capital-Journal's, Jan Biles. Mrs. Foudray believed that the combined research of Joseph A. Gervais and the in-progress forensic analysis orchestrated by Tod Swindell, had already provided enough proof to conclude that Amelia Earhart had survived after she went missing, and that in time she became known as, Irene O'Crowley Craigmile (and later, 'Bolam'.) She also correctly projected that there was much to the story that remained unknown, by way of her, "tip of the iceberg" anology. 
 

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Some reporters kept tracking the curious, unresolved case of who Irene Bolam really was, or used to be. The reason the controversy over her identity was never fully settled was found in the forensic analysis orchestrated by Tod Swindell, that ended up displaying how more than one Twentieth Century woman had been attributed to the same, Irene O'Crowley Craigmile Bolam identity. It also revealed that the Irene who faced the press in 1970, appeared nowhere identified as 'Irene' prior to the 1940s. In short, she was not the original Irene, who is shown again below: 
 

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Above Center:
The original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, in
1930, shown between her husband and father.
After meeting Amelia Earhart through her
aunt, she briefly became a pilot herself until
 a pregnancy interrupted her flying days. 
Not by accident, no clear photos of the
original Irene are readily available today.
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"It's sad, in a way, how the profound greatness of Amelia Earhart's person became lost in the so-called mystery of her disappearance. Here, for a brief moment let's again look back at the outcome of Amelia's loss through words generated by the White House nine months after she was declared missing

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As mentioned, the White House never did reveal what it knew about Amelia Earhart's world flight outcome, and by now it is certain that the general public was dissuaded from being able to realize what really happened to Amelia.
 
Today, people seem to have forgotten that Amelia's 1937 disappearance was an international controversy, because it ended up being systemically swept under the rug of official history by the U.S. federal government. This exercise was already in the works in September of 1939, when Germany invaded Poland.
 
The facts of Amelia Earhart's loss continued to be obfuscated throughout the war years as well, and then even more exponentially after the war was over. Indeed, the effort to muddle the truth about what became of Amelia Earhart, actually continued on into the 1950s, until finally, it was determined that people in general had been conditioned enough to accept that Amelia simply crashed and sank at unknown ocean coordinates prior to completing her world flight, even though that was a far cry from what had actually happened.
 
Heeding to the false dictates of Amelia's living family members, institutions overseen by the U.S. federal government, and its offshoot cottage industries that managed to keep the the curious stupefied, this is all the public continues to know at this present space in time. And that's a shame. Basically, for decades gone by the citizenry of the United States has been spoon fed non-truths about Amelia Earhart's world flight outcome, by individuals that felt they were doing it for the better good of the body public. Anymore, though, it is obvious that Amelia managed to live-on and become known as one of three Twentieth Century women attributed to the same Irene O'Crowley Craigmile identity." Tod Swindell   
 

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Above is Amelia Earhart and the post-1940 only Irene in a digital composite. Over the years people were conditioned to not pay attention to the never fully settled, Irene Bolam Versus McGraw-Hill lawsuit. Now, in 2021, the forensic analysis arranged by Tod Swindell, that concluded Amelia Earhart and the post-1940 only Irene were the same human being, has proved itself to be an incontestable equation. To better ascertain this for yourself, keep going to learn more about this new, fortified reality. 
  

 

"In the late 1990s, I couldn't believe it when I came to know Joseph A. Gervais, the Air Force officer whose ten year investigation had inspired the 1970 McGraw-Hill book, and he mentioned that no one had seriously compared Irene Bolam to Amelia Earhart before. It seemed odd, because after decades he was still insisting that she was the former Amelia Earhart." Tod Swindell 

 

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Tod Swindell and Joseph A. Gervais in 2002. 
 
 

"Many theories have been given by many different people; some bordering on the absurd, some plausible. Gervais’ theory as to what happened to Amelia Earhart is one of the plausible ones. Gervais and his colleagues were seasoned Air Force pilots, and thus, understood the problems in flying long distances over water as well as the technical aspects of flying aircraft. Their experience and some of the documents and leads uncovered in their research led them to believe that Amelia Earhart did indeed survive." Paul A. Oelkrug, C. A., University of Texas at Dallas, 2006.

 
Below, another digital composite example from the analysis:

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Amelia Earhart
 
 

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Digital Composite
 
 

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The post-1940 Irene Bolam 

JOSEPH A. GERVAIS PHOTO
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IRENE O'CROWLEY CRAIGMILE BOLAM

Above is how the post-1940 only Irene Bolam looked in 1965. Hardly a soul felt that she resembled Amelia Earhart all that much, and while looking at this photograph that Joseph A. Gervais took of her that year, it seems understandable. Most people assumed Gervais' assertion that suggested she was the former Amelia Earhart, was debunked at some point, but it never was, and to people's astonishment, the Twenty First Century forensic analysis displayed her to have been congruent to Amelia Earhart. This included by way of Digital Face Recognition, that was much improved and became more available in the Twenty First Century: 

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Amelia Earhart...
(continued below)

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A Digital Face Recognition grid
common to the post-1940 Irene
O'Crowley Craigmile Bolam
and Amelia Earhart. Same
posturing of head position
and neck to the shoulders
is clearly evident as well.
 

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Light shading adjustments can
help to exact a common face print
within a digital composite.

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...begins to...
 

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...digitally transition into...
 

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...the post-1940 Irene
 

Tod Swindell's human comparison study revealed that more than one person had been attributed to the same Irene Bolam identity, and the one above shown compared to Amelia, was not identifiable as "Irene" prior to the 1940s. The study also determined that not only facially, but the post-1940 Irene's entire physical being was congruent to Amelia Earhart's physical being, as were her character traits. These 'forensic realities' were not known before the study took place. Why? Once again, simply put, no one had ever seriously compared Irene Bolam to Amelia Earhart before.
  

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Dr. Walter S. Birkby 

Dr. Walter S. Birkby, a noted Forensic Anthropologist who advised on key portions of Tod Swindell's analysis, challenged himself with a, 'if this, then that' argument when it came to the assertion of Amelia living-on and becoming known as Irene.

Based on the different Irene Bolam's that Dr. Birkby acknowledged the study displayed, with the Irene that proved herself to be congruent to Amelia Earhart appearing nowhere as 'Irene' prior to the 1940s, it was prudent of Dr. Birkby to offer his expert opinion in said manner.

In Rollin Reineck's book, Amelia Earhart Survived, Dr. Birkby commented on the difficulty he had in nullifying the post-1940 Irene as the former Amelia Earhart. (Dr. Birkby was originally engaged by Tod Swindell to nullify her if he could. He couldn't.)   

Dr. Birkby acknowledged that the cranium, hairline, facial features, and neck-to-torso of the post-1940 Irene were the same as Amelia's. He was also impressed with the post-1940 Irene's eyes, calling them, "a perfect match spacing wise and tear-duct to tear-duct" to Amelia's eyes.

Beyond aging and some obvious post-1940 changes that included hairstyles, fashion, and makeup, there may have been some nasal work endured by the post-1940 Irene as well, but nothing (according to Dr. Birkby) that would have been unexplainable in medical terms. Dr. Birkby also pointed out that while it varies, a person's ears and nose will continue to grow as he or she gets older. Thus his, "if this, then that" approach surely would apply where the idea was for the 'Irene Bolam' in question not to be recognized for who she used to be.

So the "if this, then that" example would be: If at some point, Amelia Earhart optioned for a non-public life going forward after she was declared "missing" in 1937, and "dead in absentia" in 1939, then her overall objective that involved changing her name and altering her appearance some, would have included her not wanting to be recognized for who she used to be.

 

 

It stands to reason: The plural Irene's realization coupled with the digital composites that revealed the post-1940 only Irene's full head-to-toe congruence to Amelia Earhart, when further combined with the overwhelming preponderance of circumstantial evidence, and the eyewitnesses that pointed to Amelia's continued existence after the date of her so-called disappearance, never amounted to, just a coincidence.

 

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Above, the post-1940 Irene in 1965, digitally transitions into Amelia in 1935. Face to face, head to head, neck to neck, shoulders to shoulders, heights, appendages, etc., all aligned with exactitude.

 

 

A key indicator of the post-1940 only Irene was the large flower pendant that she often wore. (See it outlined in the boxes below.) Joseph A. Gervais believed it to be emblematic of her former identity of 'AE' for people in the know.

 

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Merritt Island, Florida - 1965
 

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Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia - 1976
 

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Senator Hiram Bingham
& Amelia Earhart
 
 

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1977

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Digital Composite

 
 

 
Amelia Earhart
Rescued and Detained as opposed to
Captured, Imprisoned, and Executed
 
"In the Twenty First Century, clarity was delivered to the suppressed fact that Amelia Earhart did not go missing somewhere in the equatorial South Sea Islands. From the World War Two era on, in a contiguous manner, the people who saw her alive there and knew who she was shared the non-promoted reality of it with others. They commonly stressed that Amelia went down on a remote, civilized land-mass in the lower Marshall Islands, where she and her navigator, Fred Noonan, were rescued within a matter of days by Japan's Naval Authority, just as Japan was beginning to engage China in the second Sino-Japanese War.
 
This first-ever 'human comparison analysis' managed to surface non-contestable body evidence that displayed Amelia Earhart alive as 'Irene Bolam' long after she went missing. Therefore, coupled with the reality that Amelia had continued to privately live-on that way, it appears certain anymore that all along, the event of her rescue in the lower Marshall's and her subsequent detainment was nothing less than straight-forward information delivered by honest speaking people." Tod Swindell 
 

 
Amelia Earhart In The
Marshall Islands

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Above, a remarkable 1994 book authored by Donald Moyer Wilson, (revised in 1999) displayed well over a hundred testimonials offered by South Sea Islands residents, World War Two soldiers from the U.S. and Japan, U.S. military brass, and more, that described Amelia Earhart's post loss survival under Japan's stewardship. The common thread that existed among the testimonials was that Amelia went down in the lower Marshall Islands where she and her navigator were rescued and detained by Japan's Imperial Naval Authority. Although a few people said they heard that Amelia may have died while in Japan's custody, no real evidence was ever found to support that such a thing had happened.

Below once again, this Associated Press article lead-in appeared in 2002. Ever since the World War Two era, different accounts akin to this one kept surfacing. In the United States, to this very day few seem to care about this reality based version of Amelia Earhart's world flight ending:

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Below, a 'Winter of 2015' article by Larry Clark, featured in an issue of Washington State University magazine, described some recent Marshall Islands travel-adventures of school teacher and WSU alumni, Dick Spink. Well studied on Amelia Earhart, Mr. Spink first visited the Marshalls in 2006, and was amazed that the history of Amelia Earhart having been there was common knowledge: 
 

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Below, again the 1987 "50th anniversary" commemorative stamp issued by the Marshall Islands, depicts the rescue of Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, and the recovery of Amelia's plane.

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"While Amelia's rescue and detainment in the Marshall's is generally accepted to have been true by astute researchers of Amelia Earhart's missing person case, the account went awry in the 1960s, when people started pushing sensationalized conjecture that touted Amelia as a 'spy' who was captured, imprisoned, and executed. The fact is, however, nobody ever knew that to be true. In the meantime, the later introduced notion that said Amelia continued to live-on after she was rescued and detained -- that she continued to survive -- and that at some point she changed her name, seemed to go over the vast majority of people's heads. Yet it is obvious anymore, that did happen." Tod Swindell
 

 
Disclaimer: Nat Geo Versus Wikipedia 
 
Before Tod Swindell embarked on his studyprevious investigations of Amelia Earhart's disappearance and missing person case had not bothered to compare Irene Bolam to Amelia Earhart.

Wikipedia's "Irene Craigmile Bolam" page posted in 2007, is misleading. Where it states, "Bolam's personal life history has since been thoroughly documented, eliminating any possibility she was Earhart", it is now known that statement is untrue. It turned out here was an original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile who Amelia had known in the 1930s, and that was not the person who faced the press in 1970, who later demonstrated an overall congruence to Amelia Earhart. Although clear photo evidence of the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile is all but non-extant today, below is how her image appeared in a newspaper photo taken in 1930. Once again, she was not the same Irene who faced the press in 1970:
 

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1930 dated newspaper photo of Charles James Craigmile, his wife,
the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, and the original Irene's
father, Richard Joseph O'Crowley.
 
Below, the original Irene's image is enhanced.

AAAorigirene4.jpg

 
The wikipedia page also incorrectly mentions that a National Geographic hired forensic detective "concluded" that Amelia did not become known as Irene Bolam. This was and remains a fabrication issued by the person who launched the page, Dr. Alex Mandel, of Ukraine. Dr. Mandel posted the page in 2007, after learning about the comparison study Tod Swindell had embarked on. Dr. Mandel, favored a claim stating Japan had captured and imprisoned Amelia in 1937, and that she died in its custody. Japan, of course, maintains to this day that it never harmed Amelia Earhart.

In recent decades there has been an aligned contingency of individuals that have influenced news media outlets (and therefore the general public) in different directions about Amelia Earhart's 1937 world flight outcome. This has prevented the reality of Amelia's post-1940 'private life' existence from being openly embraced. While the Smithsonian and National Geographic Society have always ridden the fence about Amelia's final fate, their one exception has been to traditionally downplay the 'Amelia became Irene' conveyance.
 
The "forensic detective" who briefly appeared on a Nat Geo special in 2006, Kevin Richlin, had little foreknowledge of the Amelia-to-Irene postulation, and merely looked at a few photo samples given to him by Nat Geo's producers. After doing so, he suggested if the material they gave him was 'all there was' to support the assertion of Amelia becoming known as Irene, then he would advise the proponents of it to 'move on to something else.' Detective Richlin never deeply evaluated the postulation himself, nor did he come close to "concluding" that Amelia having changed her name to Irene was forensically untrue. Given all that was learned about it dating back to the late 1960s, it would have taken a much more serious evaluation on his part to make a forensic determination. Thus the adage, "Don't believe everything you read in wikipedia." 
 

Beauty is truth, truth beauty,
 
that is all ye know on earth,
 
and all ye need to know.
 
Keats
 

Although history tried to impress upon people that the two Irene Bolam images below represented one in the same person, the analysis revealed them to have been entirely different human beings:

0000001acvr.jpg

The above cover features a 1970s photo.
According to record, Irene O'Crowley
Craigmile Bolam died on July 7, 1982,
and a Memorial Dinner was held for
her in October. Anymore the question
is, which Irene died that year? The one
above did not match Amelia Earhart at
all. She was not the original Irene either.
Rather, she served as a mother figure
to the original Irene's 1934 born son. 

1Agervaispic2.jpg

Above book page leaf:
Reprinted with permission from Joe Klaas,
the author of the 1970 McGraw-Hill book,
Amelia Earhart LivesThe Irene in the
photo only appeared as 'Irene' after 1940.

 
Shown above, as mentioned, a key discovery that Tod Swindell made during the course of his study:  There was more than one Twentieth Century person attributed to the same Irene Bolam identity. In fact there were three, for the person featured on Irene Bolam's memorial dinner program cover was not the original Irene, nor was she the post-1940 only Irene. This is edified further down. In the meantime...

 

The Positive ID Placement Made By Irene Craigmile Bolam's Son:

 

From Tod Swindell: Thursday, February 20, 2014
Subject: Verification

 

Hi Larry,

I want you to know that I am in full agreement with you that Amelia Earhart was not your mother. Your mother, as you identified her in these younger and older version photos, led a very different life than Amelia and bore little resemblance to her physically. Our agreement on this matter is pertinent to the correct presentation of the facts.  

My conveyance is that you have positively identified these images as those of your late mother, and that she absolutely was not, and never possibly could have been Amelia Earhart. I agree with this 100%, and understand that you do too. If you could you send back a simple ‘I agree’ for verification I’d appreciate it.

Thanks,

Tod

 

Clarence Alvin 'Larry' Heller: Friday, February 21, 2014
Subject: Re: Identity Verification

The attached pictures are of my mother and she was not Amelia Earhart. C. Heller   Proof is available.

origjunior.jpg
"AROUND 1940"

038.JPG
"1970s"

 
Reviewing A White House Preface:
 

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amorgyX2.jpg

ZZZZZorders2.jpg

amorgyX3.jpg

The above sentences were photo-copied from a White House transcript that referred to the actual outcome of Amelia Earhart's 1937 world flight attempt. They were recorded in 1938, nine months after Amelia was reported 'missing'. 
 
The Executive Branch of the United States Federal Government has never revealed the details it knew about Amelia's 1937 world flight outcome, dating back to the administration of President Franklin Roosevelt.
~~~
 

Newspaper Headlines 
from July 2 & 3, 1937:

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AEmissing4.jpg

000001Aemissing1937-wichita-beacon.jpg

~~~

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Amelia in 1936

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Amelia and her later-life
  self in a digital composite.  

 
"The forensic determinations that showed Amelia Earhart's physical being alive as 'Irene' in the last half of the Twentith Century are non-contestable." Tod Swindell
 

 Reviewing the Foundation of this Forensic Research Study

The below investigative accounts of Amelia Earhart's 1937 disappearance were extensively analyzed in a recently completed study. The endeavor was undertaken to shed a better light on Amelia Earhart's old missing person case, that was historically left unresolved. The end result is a new Manuscript and Forensic Analysis entitled, Protecting Earhart. Both are set to be issued in 2021 by independent researcher and film producer, Tod Swindell. His documentary film that has been years in the making is also nearing completion. This website serves as a preview.

 

00000daughter.jpg

1960

aaagoerner.jpg

1966

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1970

LLLLoomis.jpg

1985

AAmyers3.jpg

1985

aaaadonahue.jpg

1987

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1993 UK, 1994 US

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1994, revised-1999

017.JPG

2004

Jameson.jpg

2016
 
 

All of the above investigations determined that during the pre-dawn era of World War Two, Amelia Earhart, and her navigator, Fred Noonan, did not lose their lives by crashing into the Pacific Ocean at unknown coordinates, as the public was left to assume. As well, five of them ended up concluding that Amelia Earhart not only survived beyond the date of her disappearance, [July 2, 1937] but that she continued to live-on, and in time changed her name. Most people found that hard to believe. Now, (as Paul Harvey used to say) here's the rest of the story... 

 

 

 An Old Story with a New Twist

The following material is exclusive to Tod Swindell's Twenty First Century analysis, that revealed a non-publicized forensic reality about Amelia Earhart. 

 

As the world knows, Amelia Earhart was declared 'missing' in 1937, and then 'dead in absentia' in 1939. Thus far, historians at the Smithsonian have been encouraging people to not pay attention to the digital composites issued by the analysis, even though they are non-contestable.
 
Again:

1aIprofileA1A.jpg

The post-1940
Irene in 1977
 

1AcompD.jpg

Amelia Earhart and the post-1940 Mrs. Irene
O'Crowley Craigmile Bolam, AKA Mrs. Guy Bolam
in a Digital Composite from the overall analysis.
(She had wed Guy Bolam of England in 1958.)
 
 

ZZZZZZIOC2ABC1ABC.jpg

The post-1940 Irene O'Crowley
Craigmile Bolam in 1977
 

 
The comparisons not only demonstrated an overall Amelia-to-Irene congruence, they also evidenced that the 'Irene' above was not identifiable as 'Irene' prior to 1940.
 
It is essential to recognize that there actually was a 1930s pilot by the name of, Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, who, although her prominent family never officially reported it, went missing close to the same time Amelia Earhart did. This person was simply known as 'Irene Craigmile' and both Amelia and her well-known pilot friend, Viola Gentry, knew her and had flown with her. According to Viola, Amelia had introduced her to Irene Craigmile. Learn more about the original Irene further down. For now, below are excerpts from a letter written in 1967 by one Elmo Pickerill, who at the time was serving as secretary of a Long Island based club called, The Early Birds of Aviation: 
 
 

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AAA36xpickerill5.jpg

1abeevi2.jpg

Above, a small brownie camera photo
from 1932, listed Amelia climbing on the
wing, Jack Warren in the rear pilot seat, and
Irene Craigmile & Viola Gentry standing. The
plane had recently been purchased by Irene.
 
Below once again, is a photo that appeared in the Akron Ohio Beacon Journal on September 1, 1932. Outlined in white is Amelia Earhart; outlined in gray is Viola Gentry; outlined in black and fully shaded is the original Irene Craigmile: 

1AAnewsA.jpg

Where one takes the time to enlarge each facial image in the above photo, it's somewhat curious that Irene's is the only one where no facial features are discernable. The photo was reprinted from today's available newspaper archives.
 

ZZAACJICRJOC4A1A.jpg

Again, the 1930 dated newspaper photo of
Charles James Craigmile, his wife, Irene, and
Irene's father, Richard Joseph O'Crowley.
 
Below, Irene's image is enhanced.

AAAorigirene4.jpg

In late 1931, Charles James Craigmile
fell ill and died within three days time.
From his September obituary:  

00001ACJcraigABC.jpg

00001ACJcraigAAAA.jpg

A year after Charles died, his widow, Irene,
began taking flying instructions from Viola
Gentry's husband, Jack Warren.
 

   

AAA36cover.jpg


 
"The courts have yet to decide
the matter once and for all."
 
After the news story about her broke in 1970, Mrs. Guy Bolam, sued for defamation. Her attorney referenced where the Air Force officers' new book, Amelia Earhart Lives, contained factual errata beyond insinuating that his client, Mrs. Bolam, was possibly a bigamist and a traitor. Four years later, in 1974, as the follow-up news article stated, the 'courts' still had not decided if Mrs. Guy Bolam was or wasn't the former Amelia Earhart, and in the end it was left that way. When her defamation case was finally settled in 1976, Mrs. Guy Bolam, who had originally sought $1.5 million in damages, was awarded $60,000 to be paid by the book's publisher, McGraw-Hill. The Air Force officers were left alone, however, since the question of Mrs. Bolam's former identity remained unanswered. Amazingly, it stayed that way well into the Twenty First Century, until Tod Swindell's comprehensive forensic analysis was undertaken, the first one ever to compare Mrs. Guy Bolam to Amelia Earhart, that naturally delivered its telling results.
 


 
A handwriting example from the character
traits section of the comparison analysis:

000000001Aibsig1.jpg

Above is a cryptic handwritten line from a 1967 note penned by the post-1940 Irene to Joseph A. Gervais. She actually wrote about two people who, 'knew us both well as Amelia Earhart and Irene Craigmile'. 
 
Below is Amelia's own 'Amelia M Earhart' signature the way it appeared on a school form she filled out when she was seventeen. The similarity of the cursive styles is no coincidence since the same hand produced them.   
 

000000001AEsig1.jpg

Below, more from the Character Traits section of the comparison study, some of the post-1940 Irene (O'Crowley Craigmile) Bolam's cursive letters are shown on the left, and some cursive letter samples from when she lived as Amelia are shown on the right:

000000001AsideswritA4A.jpg

000000001AsideswritA5A.jpg

000000001AsideswritA6A.jpg

000000001AsideswritA1A.jpg

000000001AsideswritA2A.jpg

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Looking Back at the Life
of Mrs. Guy Bolam
 

Note: It was Joseph A. Gervais (USAF Ret.), who in 1965, encountered Mrs. Guy Bolam at a gathering of senior pilots in New York. After he was introduced to her, without formally receiving permission, he took a photograph showing her next to her British husband, Guy Bolam, who she had wed in 1958: 
 

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aaaaklassbook23.jpg

Above left, the 1965 photo taken by Joseph A. Gervais of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Bolam; center, from the original negative; right, the infamous 1970 book, Amelia Earhart Lives, that the 'Guy and Irene Bolam' photo appeared in. It is easy to see why Mrs. Bolam did not remind people of Amelia Earhart, until recent years, when the digital composites the forensic analysis generated were issued.
 

-

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Above: February 5, 2000, retired USAF Major Joseph A. Gervais, accepts the Amelia Earhart Society of Researchers 'Historical Achievement Award' for his unparalleled investigative research and final analysis of Amelia Earhart's failed world flight attemptThe Society's founding President, Bill Prymak, referred to Joe Gervais as, "A World War Two flying hero widely recognized as the world's leading authority regarding the subject of Amelia Earhart's disappearance." Joseph A. Gervais died in 2005, having never disavowed that at some point after she went missing in 1937, Amelia Earhart took the name of a past 1930s' acquaintance of hers, Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, whose demise was obscured to enable it.
 
One might ask: Why is it that people in general have never heard of Joseph A. Gervais?
 
The best answer was given by Gervais himself: "No one was was ever supposed to know that Amelia survived and took on another identity, so my 1960s investigation that learned she did was swept under the rug of official history." 
 

 
Once Again...

 

 

AAAAustin1.jpg

1
Above, Amelia Earhart, age 39...  
 
 
 

 

 

AAAAustin2.jpg

2
...digitally transitions into...  
 

 

 

AAA36compCA.jpg

3
...Mrs. Guy Bolam in 1965
 

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Amelia Earhart, age 36...

00000000aaa10A1.jpg

 ...digitally transitions into... 

 

ZZZZZZIOCCB7.jpg

...Mrs. Guy Bolam in 1977
 

"Before his passing took place in 2005, I befriended and came to know Joseph A. Gervais, and I was surprised when he mentioned that no one had ever really compared Irene Bolam to Amelia Earhart before. Based on the national news-making claim that he made about her in 1970, I found that hard to believe and decided to do something about it."  Tod Swindell
 

 
Below, the most significant realization from Tod Swindell's overall analysis, that is tantamount to understanding the duplicity that characterized the Amelia-to-Irene equation and how it was originally contrived, was the discovery of not just two, but three different Twentieth Century women having been attributed to the same Irene O'Crowley Craigmile identity. This was never ascertained before. Not to omit, the one who matched Amelia Earhart appeared nowhere as 'Irene' prior to 1940:

1

ZZAACJICRJOC4A1A.jpg

AAAorigirene4.jpg

2

origjunior.jpg

AAAAgoodolderIJRAA.jpg

3

ZZZZZZZ46AE.jpg

IB65ABC5.jpg

 
Above on the left is the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile in 1930, who Amelia Earhart had known, shown between her first husband, Charles James Craigmile, and her father, Richard Joseph O'Crowley. She did not resemble Amelia Earhart. The original Irene went missing around the same time Amelia did. What became of her is unknown .
 
Above in the center, shown in younger and older forms, is the surrogate mother of the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile's 1934 born son. She was also attributed to the same identity of Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, after she took over raising the original Irene's son in 1937.
 
To the right is the third Irene O'Crowley Craigmile-Bolam, shown on top in 1946, and below in 1965. She married Englishman, Guy Bolam, in 1958. The forensic study concluded that she was not identifiable as Irene O'Crowley Craigmile prior to 1940. [The math should start to get simple here.]
 

1AAGIAEprof.jpg

Amelia
 
 

 
Digitally Forensic

  

00000000ae2bA3.jpg

Amelia

00000000000aaa10A1B.jpg

Post-1940 Irene & Amelia
digitally combined

.
aaaaadidgitalface3.jpg
.


Accredited Digital Face Recognition programs
arrived in the Twenty First Century

Tod Swindell's comprehensive forensic research study that deeply reviewed the known facts of Amelia Earhart's disappearance, also examined the full-life story of Irene O'Crowley Craigmile Bolam. This included comparing her physical being and character traits to Amelia's. According to a purely objective viewpoint, the results of his study only appear to affirm the concealed reality of Amelia Earhart's post-1940 life as, Irene.

 

~~~

 The Amelia To Irene Forensic Study

© Tod Swindell 1997-2020

What The Entirety Of The Accumulated Data Revealed

data (noun): a general collection of facts, such as numbers, words, measurements, observations and descriptions of things

forensic (adjective): belonging to, used in, or suitable to courts of law or to public discussion and debate

~~~

First, a look at how the Amelia Earhart to Irene Bolam assertion became clouded by misinformation:  

 

Note: Of the invented Amelia Earhart cottage industries shown below, the oldest and most notable being Tighar, and the most recent being Chasing Earhart, (that surfaced in 2017) none of them produced significant factual data pertaining to the 1937 disappearance and missing person case of Amelia Earhart. Nor did they produce authentic evidence to help explain what actually happened to her. Basically, cottage industries such as these operate as businesses that exploit the mystery of Amelia Earhart's disappearance in the interest of adulatory pursuits and financial benefit.    

 

01-tighar.jpg

 
TIGHAR

-1-tnauticos.jpg

NAUTICOS

01-tchasing.jpg

 

CHASING EARHART

 

Contrarily, the 1960s investigations of two individuals, Fred Goerner and Joseph A. Gervais, along with the 1980s investigation of Randall Brink, that reviewed and solidified the data originally generated by Goerner and Gervais, and then expanded on it, well eclipses any information produced by other parties on the subjects of Amelia Earhart's 1937 disappearance and her post-loss missing person case. 

Based on the additional accumulated data that supports the authentic findings of Goerner, Gervais, and Brink, it is pragmatic to ignore viewpoints expressed by Amelia Earhart cottage industries that offer other ideas. Especially where so much of the data the earlier investigations generated has now been solidified by the Twenty First Century efforts of investigative researcher, Tod Swindell. His first-ever, 'Amelia-to-Irene' comparative analysis was part of a massive, in-depth study that commenced some twenty odd years ago. The results he achieved only affirmed that Joseph A. Gervais, was correct all along where he determined that Amelia Earhart lived well beyond 1937, excepting that she had changed her name for both political reasons, and for the sake of her own future privacy. 

"Special recognition goes to Tod Swindell, who undertook an extensive, in-depth forensic analysis of the post-1940 Irene (O'Crowley Craigmile) Bolam as compared to Amelia Earhart, to show the world they were one in the same person." In his book, Amelia Earhart Survived, a quote from author and golden age of aviation historian, USAF Colonel Rollin C. Reineck. [Colonel Reineck was a Joseph A. Gervais collaborator from 1990 to 2005.]

 

Tod2A.jpg

Tod Swindell

 

Some years ago, after meeting and getting to know Joseph A. Gervais (USAF Ret.) from 1996 to 2005, it perplexed me to learn that no one had ever disproved his 1970 assertion that stated Amelia Earhart had changed her name and continued to live-on for decades after she was declared 'missing' in 1937. This is because the former Amelia Earhart hired powerful lawyers that did an incredible job when it came to obfuscating the life story of Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, a real person Amelia had known in the 1930s, whose leftover identity the famous pilot went on to assume for herself after 1940.

Today, we need only remind ourselves that from 1970 to 2016, five nationally published book authors averred that Amelia Earhart survived her disappearance and later became known as Irene. Could the reason be they were advancing the truth, except the general public, that was basically unfamiliar with the shouted-down 'Amelia to Irene' story, found it too hard to believe? Yep. That's basically it. I've worked hard on developing and exposing the reality of this truth ever since meeting Joseph A. Gervais, a great pilot himself and a veteran of three foreign wars, who died in 2005, never having disavowed what he alone discovered. As the year 2021 kicks off a new decade with positive vaccine news, perhaps it is time for our body public to begin taking the now obvious reality of Amelia's later life existence more seriously. Especially when compared to the variety off-base, Johnny come lately Earhart theories presented in recent decades by glitzy looking cottage industries out there, the ineffective activities of which dominate the news media and the internet, in turn hindering the verisimilitude of Amelia's post-1940 life as Irene O'Crowley Craigmile from cleanly shining through. Tod Swindell, 2020  

 


Below the following dedications, continue to examine Tod Swindell's landmark forensic undertaking.
 

 

Dedicated to

Doris Kearns Goodwin and Amy Kleppner

DKGoodwin.jpg

Akleppner.jpg

   

Above, Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin (left) and Amy Kleppner
(right) Educator, Doctor of Philosophy, Amelia Earhart's niece. 
 

RuthbaderG.jpg

Justice
Ruth Bader Ginsburg
1933-2020
 

Also honoring the life of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who, "...bore witness to, argued for, and helped to constitutionalize the most hard fought and least-appreciated revolution in modern American history: the emancipation of women. Aside from Thurgood Marshall, no single American has so wholly advanced the cause of equality under the law." Jill Lepore, The New Yorker

~~~
Most importantly, remembering Amelia Earhart... 
 

00-AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAB3.jpg

Amelia Earhart, 1937 

"Amelia Earhart was interested in the status of women from an early age. She compiled a scrapbook about women who had nontraditional jobs, mainly in male dominated fields. She wanted women to achieve greater equality in the aviation industry. She persisted because she loved aviation and she also was passionate about achieving equality for women." Amelia Earhart's niece, Amy Kleppner [2018 Canary & Co interview]

  

 

00-AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAB3.jpg

Amelia Earhart
 

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AAAorigirene4.jpg

Again, the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile
looked nothing like Amelia Earhart. After
1940, Amelia virtually replaced her. Read
more about the original Irene below.

ZZZZZZIOC2ABC1ABC.jpg

The former Amelia Earhart in 1977, living
as Mrs. Irene (O'Crowley Craigmile) Bolam.
 
The original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, who
Amelia Earhart had known, earned her pilot's
license in 1933, then gave birth to a son in 1934.
She did not frequent airfields as much after that, 
and her license was not renewed after 1937. What
became of the original Irene is a mystery unto itself.
Before 1940 arrived, a surrogate mother had already
been raising her 1934 born son for her, and her son
grew up believing she was his biological mother.
~~~
Below is the original Irene's son, Clarence Alvin "Larry" Heller's positive ID placement that he put in writing in 2014, as a contribution to Tod Swindell's forensic research and comparison analysis. Mr. Heller met twice with Tod Swindell in New York, and optioned his version of his mother's life story to him through the law firm of Cowan Liebowitz & Latman PC.   
 
 
 

 

The Positive ID Placement Made By Irene Craigmile Bolam's Son:

 

From Tod Swindell: Thursday, February 20, 2014
Subject: Verification

 

Hi Larry,

I want you to know that I am in full agreement with you that Amelia Earhart was not your mother. Your mother, as you identified her in these younger and older version photos, led a very different life than Amelia and bore little resemblance to her physically. Our agreement on this matter is pertinent to the correct presentation of the facts.  

My conveyance is that you have positively identified these images as those of your late mother, and that she absolutely was not, and never possibly could have been Amelia Earhart. I agree with this 100%, and understand that you do too. If you could you send back a simple ‘I agree’ for verification I’d appreciate it.

Thanks,

Tod

 

Clarence Alvin 'Larry' Heller: Friday, February 21, 2014
Subject: Re: Identity Verification

The attached pictures are of my mother and she was not Amelia Earhart. C. Heller   Proof is available.

origjunior.jpg
"AROUND 1940"

038.JPG
"1970s"


 
Now, take another look:

1

0000001IOC14to20.jpg

AAAorigirene4.jpg

2

origjunior.jpg

AAAAgoodolderIJRAA.jpg

3

ZZZZZZZ46AE.jpg

IB65ABC5.jpg

 
It is fairly easy for one to recognize with a naked eye, that the above younger to older images are those of three different people; the original Irene, the surrogate mother Irene, and the post-1940 only Irene. 
 

BBBIjrClar.jpg

The above photograph, described in newsprint as taken in 1937, shows the original Irene's son, Clarence Alvin "Larry" Heller, with his "mother" in the Florida everglades, although it is hard to truly determine which mother is shown with him. The annulment of his parent's marriage was just getting underway at the time, and Larry Heller's father, a Brooklyn based pilot by the name of Al Heller, moved alone to Buffalo, New York that same year.
 
As the story went, the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, had become pregnant out of wedlock with Al Heller's child (Larry) in mid-1933, so the two eloped to marry and she briefly took his last name -- until it became known to her that Al was still legally married to another woman he'd had a child with.
 
After the annulment was completed, (that basically says a marriage never legally happened) the surname of 'Heller' went back to being Craigmile, the last name of the original Irene's first husband, who had died in 1931. Al and Irene's son, Larry, however, kept the surname of 'Heller' as was listed on his birth certificate.
 
It seems somewhat out of place that in the annulment complaint, Al Heller was described as "improvident" when it came to the matter of supporting his wife and son, where the photo above depicts them looking fairly well supported. Not many people could afford travel trailers, kiddie cars, and vacations to Florida back then. May as well add here, that it was Miami, Florida where Amelia departed from on June 1, 1937 to begin her world flight.
 
It does appear to have been the case, that both Amelia and the original Irene went missing approximate to each other, leaving it possible to consider that the original Irene, a pilot herself and a friend of Amelia's, had flown in the other purported plane that had been designated to coincide with Amelia's world flight plan to do reconnaissance during the Pacific leg of Amelia's journey, and that the original Irene and her possible 'British furnished' male co-pilot met with tragic misfortune while doing so.
 
The original Irene was a pretty good pilot. The below May of 1933 mention in the Brooklyn Eagle newspaper was a testament to this fact. For anyone to fly alone in his or her own plane from New York to Chicago and back, that was a hardy 'private pilot' feat during that time period. It was a month or two after that, though, she realized she was pregnant with Al Heller's child.
 

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As revealed in a 1938 White House transcript discovered decades later, it was against "all orders" (see below) that Amelia headed toward the Marshall Islands, the last known area the other flight duo was believed to have been doing fly-overs. Amelia aborted her known flight plan to head there in an effort to try and find out what had happened to Irene, and to help if she could. Unfortunately, the move backfired and left her as an additional suspect pertaining to the recon flight plan. This was deduced from a September of 1938 OS-2 intelligence report discovered decades later, that stated that Amelia  made the final call to head "north" (her given bearing was actually northwest) and she continued to check in at half-hour intervals while doing so until she was out of range. The OS-2 report directly contradicted the two-way radio report released by the White House two months earlier, in July, a full year after Amelia's world flight had taken place. Read more about the two plane scenario in the "British Connection" section, relative to the 1985 book by James Donahue, that is elaborated on further down. [Note: First hand accounts from Lockheed employees, the manufacturer of Amelia's plane, did convey that more than one plane was prepared for and involved with Amelia's world flight plan.] If this sounds like a far-fetched idea, it merely serves as a potential explanation for the original Irene's non-reported demise, and why Amelia, who survived her 'missing person case' ordeal, later ended up using Irene's name. This suggestion was first introduced by Tod Swindell in his copyrighted manuscript, Protecting Earhart.

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Above, another excerpt from the May 13, 1938 White House transcript that denied First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt's request for its 'report' on Amelia Earhart's premature world flight ending from the previous year. FDR right hand man, Henry P. Morgenthau Jr., made these comments directed to Mrs. Roosevelt, adding to the reason for his additional aforementioned comment below, of not wanting to ever make public what really happened to Amelia. Of note, the White House never did make public the information it withheld. It is apparent that initially, the White House deduced that Amelia and her navigator, Fred Noonan met their demise after they entered Japan's forbidden fly zone of the Marshall Islands. It wasn't until August of 1939, about eight months after Amelia was legally declared dead in absentia, that the White House first became privy to new information, suggesting that at least Amelia was possibly still alive under Japan's stewardship. More accounts of Amelia's ongoing survival surfaced after that, but by then Germany had invaded Poland (September 1, 1939) marking the beginning of World War Two. 

amorgyX3.jpg

Below left is the cover image of the James Donahue book, that expounded on a non-publicized arrangement to involve more than one plane in Amelia's world flight plan. Next to it, once again is the 1987 commemorative stamp issued by the Marshall Islands. The stamp depicts Amelia, her navigator, Fred Noonan, and Amelia's plane being retrieved in the lower Marshall Islands. As noted, this has always been considered 'common history' in the South Sea Islands region that Amelia Earhart went missing in. The Smithsonian Institution, however, as an acting agent of the U.S. federal government, all-but censures any version of Amelia's continued existence after the date of her disappearance, July 2, 1937. 

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-

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1953

Recognize her above? Probably not, but this is
the post-1940 Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, or,
'the former Amelia Earhart' in Hawaii,
before she married British international
businessman, Guy Bolam, in 1958.
 

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Above: The former Amelia Earhart in Jamaica in 1976.

Question

Can an individual change over time physically, emotionally, spiritually, and egotistically to a point where they become difficult to recognize after a long period of absence? Consider the following quote from Twentieth-Century philosopher, Uell Stanley Anderson:

"If we think of ourselves as bodies, our changing self becomes apparent. It is nearly impossible even for families to recognize a loved one after thirty years of absence, so greatly has the self altered. And a little reflection upon the changing quality of consciousness is sure to give us some insight into the numberless selves our surface minds and egos have become since first appearing in the world." Uell Stanley Andersen (1917-1986)

 

Now, here again, consider the 1987 words of Monsignor James Francis Kelley, a past President of Seton Hall College, who perhaps was the former Amelia Earhart's closest later-life friend and confidante. Although he demurred when reporters asked him questions about her, to certain individuals he knew, Father Kelley, who held PhD's in Philosophy and Psychology, disclosed that his friend, the post-1940 Irene, indeed was the former Amelia Earhart. He included the rationale of why she decided to become another person in the following aforementioned way:

"After all she'd been through she didn't want to be the famous Amelia Earhart anymore."

The point being made here: The general public did not know 'all Amelia had been through' both during her famous career -- and especially during her long years of absence -- and how it altered her psyche to a place where she no longer wished to be the famous celebrity she once was.

 

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Life was never easy for Amelia. Before she went missing her nine years of fame consumed her; then during the eight years she was not in view, wherever she was and whatever she was doing was very likely no picnic for her. Consider the following Doris Rich quote about Amelia's famous career from prior to her 1937 world flight:
 

"Over the nine years spanning her first and last transoceanic flights, Amelia Earhart became one of the most famous women in the world. The private Amelia disliked that fame intensely." From author-historian, Doris Rich's 1989 biography of Amelia Earhart.
 
 

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Why People Didn't Know
 
As we enter the third decade of the Twenty First Century, the first ever, Amelia to Irene forensic comparison study left no doubt that Joseph A. Gervais was right all along about having discovered the former Amelia Earhart living as Irene (O'Crowley Craigmile) Bolam, in 1965.

Why people didn't see this before, and why a human comparison study was not orchestrated until after Tod Swindell came along, is partially explained in the following way:
 
Beyond the 'official government silence' observed toward the matter ever since the event of Amelia's loss occurred, there were four main players involved in maintaining the nondisclosure of Amelia's ongoing existence with a different name after 1970, the year that Joseph A. Gervais went public with his discovery. They were, 1.) Amelia's sister, Muriel  2.) Amelia's pilot friend from the 1930s, Viola Gentry  3.) Clarence 'Larry' Heller, the 1934 born son of the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, and 4.) Most significantly, the former Amelia Earhart herself. Under the photo of the original Irene, shown between her husband and father below, the above mentioned individuals are shown in younger and older forms:  
 

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Again, Charles James Craigmile, the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile,
and the original Irene's father, Richard Joseph O'Crowley, in 1930
 
 

Muriel

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Viola

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'Larry'

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Post-1940
Irene [F.K.A. AE]

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Above columns, left to right: Amelia's sister, Muriel, in younger and older forms. 
 
The next column shows Viola Gentry above, with Amelia, far left, and Elinor Smith in between them. Underneath is Viola in 1965 with Guy Bolam, the British husband that the former Amelia Earhart married in 1958.
 
The next column shows Clarence 'Larry' Heller, the 1934 born son of the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, above in a 1982 newspaper photo, and in a more recent photo underneath it.
 
The next column shows the former Amelia Earhart, above in a 1965 photo, living as the post-1940 Irene (O'Crowley Craigmile) Bolam, and in a 1977 formal photo portrait taken of her underneath it. 
 
All four individuals were quick to refute the 1970 Gervais' assertion, that stated in the 1940s, Amelia Earhart had quietly resurfaced in the United States with a different name and a new profession. Anymore, though, by virtue of the study results, it is clear that such a thing did happen.
 
For the sake of what reality states, while focusing on how they were individually quoted when it came to what Joseph A. Gervais asserted at the conclusion of his 1960-to-1970 investigation, the duplicity that went on to characterize the issue of Gervais' concern is revealed.

1.) Starting with Muriel's quote, beyond admitting that she 'knew' (the post-1940) Irene, she countered: "Its just ridiculous. There is practically no physical resemblance."

2.) From Viola: "Why, that's ridiculous. I knew Irene since 1930, and I knew Amelia Earhart, too, when we all flew from Roosevelt Field. They certainly are not the same woman."

3.) From Larry Heller: "My mother is not Amelia Earhart."

4.) From the post-1940 Irene, FKA 'Amelia Earhart': "I am not a mystery woman and I am not Amelia Earhart."
 
Note: Based on the decades worth of data accumulated after the above individuals offered their comments, and upon analyzing the context of each quote, the line between truth and non-truth becomes blurred. This is due to the realization of the study results exhibiting that more than one person had been attributed to the same Irene O'Crowley Craigmile identity.
 
Therefore, Muriel was not so incorrect when she said there was, "practically no physical resemblance" ...since the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile, did not at all look like her sister, Amelia. However, the post-1940 Irene, who Muriel knew in her later life years, proved to be a head to toe match to her sister, Amelia.
 
As well, Viola Gentry definitely had known -- and sometimes flew with the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile in the 1930s -- just as she knew the post-1940 Irene (O'Crowley Craigmile) Bolam in her later life years, who used to be Amelia. Since it was true that the post-1940 Irene was not the same woman as the original Irene, Viola was not so incorrect there.
 
As for Clarence 'Larry' Heller, clearly, Amelia Earhart, who was famously in the public eye in 1934, (the year Mr. Heller was born) was not his biological mother, rather, the original Irene O'Crowley Craigmile was. So his statement of, "my mother was not Amelia Earhart" was correct as well.
 
Last but not least, the former Amelia Earhart did not live a mysterious life as 'Irene' after 1940, and technically, she no longer was Amelia Earhart. Rather, when she said what she did in 1970, she was in her third decade of being known as Irene.